The classic white wedding dress has been in fashion since the days of Queen Victoria, but over the decades bridal fashion trends have changed significantly.

From loose dresses in 1910, flapper- styles in the 1920s, ball gowns in the 1950s and mutton sleeves in the 1960s, fast forward to 2022 and, after a long awaited lull in events due to Covid, we are officially back in the swing of things, celebrating left, right, and centre – and weddings are in the spotlight.

Searches for pre-owned wedding gowns have been up 103% since March* and page views for vintage designer wedding pieces jumped by 53%. A second hand wedding dress is becoming a go-to option for today’s conscious consumer and eco- friendly bride who wants to look and do good when making decisions for her big day.

SAY YES TO VINTAGE

What goes around comes around, which is why second hand will always supply you with a take on a modern trend. A vintage dress (20+ years old) is more often than not made with incredibly high quality material and is constructed to perfection. These dresses tell a story that can be intertwined with your own fairytale of saying “I do.”

SAY YES TO SECOND HAND

Helping a dress to continue its life is not only good for your purse but also good for the environment. When choosing pre-loved, it’s safe to say the condition of the dress should be relatively new as they’re often only worn once. You can always source some exceptional, timely, and relevant dresses. Remember to add a personal touch with accessories!

dress

SAY YES TO HAND-ME- DOWNS

Not everyone has a wedding dress sitting in their wardrobe ready to go, but most have some special items that are white and would be perfect for the big day. Think outside the box and be open to styles that better represent you. It doesn’t even have to be a dress – it could be a jumpsuit or a one-of- a-kind design made by customising something old.

www.secondhandstyling.co.uk

 

 

 

Bouquet: Bloom and Gorgeous Flowers

Model: Kat @stylecyle

Photo Credit: Cohort Pictures

*Lyst’s 2021 Wedding Report